Talk To Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

Converse with Frank is the extensive running anti-drug movement the UK has had. But has it actually worked and stopped drug use?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. The message delivered by the advert had not been heard before either "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank Cordial Private Drug Guidance

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. The idea was to build a reliable "older brother" image that could provide advice to teenagers about banned substances. Frank is has become a household name among the young people due to the many adventure stories that came from the theme such as Pablo the drugs mule dog to a tour of the brain warehouse.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Surprisingly, the funny imitations of the Frank videos found on YouTube are quite polite. As there is nothing that remotely suggests Frank is a government project, the campaign is viewed as a first occurrence funded by the government.

Substance education has developed a lot since Nancy Reagan, and in the United Kingdom, Grange Hill cast encouraged teens to simply "Say No" to drugs, a campaign which several professionals now think had the opposite of the desire effect.


Like the Frank campaign, most European ads now focus on giving unbiased information so that young people can make up their own minds. You still see pictures of prison bars and upset parents, though, in countries where dealing drugs will get you in serious trouble with the law. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

Above the Influence, which is an ad that has lasted for a very long time to encourage young people to seek for alternatives to drugs, and which has gulped the UK government some huge amount of money combine caution and humour. The accentuation is on conversing with youngsters in their own particular dialect - one promotion demonstrates a group of "stoners" marooned on a couch. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. A classic illustration is a current Canadian business, part of the DrugsNot4Me arrangement, which demonstrates an appealing, sure young lady's change into a shuddering and hollow eyed smash-up on account of "drugs."

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


Frank was ground-breaking and criticised by Conservative politicians at the time because they felt it suggest that there were some good things to go along with all the bad about drugs.


An early online advertisement told people that cocaine made you feel on of the world.

Hitting the middle road with an ad to give the right message always proved to be a challenge. The person behind this cocaine ad has said that he now thinks he thought the average person browsing the web had a longer attention span. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. However, Powell claims the objective was to be more open with youngsters regarding substances, in an attempt to form the credibility of the Frank image.

A 67% of the youth say they would ask Frank for advice related to drugs according to the Home Office. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. The argument is that this is proof that the approach is working.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

In the years since the campaign started, drug use in the UK is down by 9%; however, experts say this might be because marijuana use has declined, most like due to changing attitudes toward smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a national drug education program that was established at the Home Office of the British Government and the Department of Health in 2003. It is envisioned to lessen the utilization of both lawful and illicit medications by instructing youngsters as well as teenagers about the potential impacts of medications and liquor. It has run numerous media promotions on radio and the web.


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Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs

  • A website
  • A private phone number that is available round-the-clock
  • Email
  • An anonymous live chat every afternoon 2-6pm
  • A facility to find counselling besides management