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What Is Al-Anon

Getting To Know More About Al-Anon

Al-Anon is a network of family support groups, which helps persons whose families are affected by alcoholism. The aim of these groups is to be recuperative and curative.


Al Anon was founded in 1951 and is an organization which provides support to the friends and family members of people who are addicted to alcohol. Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is the first alcoholic support group that was started by the husband of Lois Wilson who went on to later start her own support group, Al-Anon. She formed an organization for people similar to her, after confronting the hardships of assisting a recovering alcoholic in her own life. Al-Anon is a self-supported organization which exists thanks to financial contributions from members. The meetings aim to help members cope with and know how to support and help their loved ones fighting alcoholism.


To assist members by having them understand they aren't alone in their struggle, is the principal target of Al-Anon.


Alcoholism Affecting The Whole Family

Al-Anon sees alcoholism as a family illness, because it negatively affects both the drinkers and people around them. The recovery process is a joint effort and the family members and other people close to the addict must be involved.

Many family members are known to blame themselves for the drinking problem of their loved one, and in many cases do not understand why the recovery of their loved one is a priority. These problems are handled by meetings and members are assisted to understand alcoholism as a family illness.


Alateen- Al-Anon Meetings For Teenagers

Al-Anon is also home for a group which is identified as Alateen and is catering to youngsters that are affected by alcoholism within their family.

Young people are permitted to meet with others of their own age at these meetings, making the experiences more similar and advantageous.


The Benefits Of Attending An Al-Anon Group

Members of Al-Anon benefit from being introduced to a number of people and families who could have suffered from the problem of alcoholism. Despite every individual being different Al-Anon commonly had interrelated experiences within their struggles. With this program, you get to share experiences with people who have faced situations similar to yours. There are Al-Anon meetings available all across our country. Give us a call on 0800 246 1509 to assist you find one close by you.


What Happens During The Meetings

The meetings held by Al-Anon are open to any individual who could be affected by the alcoholism of another individual. If you are worried about somebody's heavy drinking or if the drunkard's lifestyle somehow affects your life , Al-Anon will help you.

Some of the attendees are reluctant to go to their first meeting because they do not know what to expect. Here are some things to remember when considering whether to attend a meeting:

  • Al-Anon is anonymous, which is highly essential
  • Everybody present in each meeting has faced the problem of alcoholism, either personally or has a family member suffering from it
  • No one is subject to talk about or discuss their issue, but it is encouraged
  • There Are Several Kinds Of Meetings
  • You may find some more beneficial to you than others.
  • Al-Anon is not based on any religion
  • The 12 recovery steps are followed in this group

Al-Anon meetings are carried out under a slogan that encourages all attendees to "take only what they like, leaving the rest." The members get to go about their own personal experiences.


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Al-Anon And The Twelve Steps

Usually, meetings start with someone reading from the 12 step program. The 12 steps were adapted from the AA 12 Step program. An Al-Anon member is required to take on a sponsor who will help them work through the program and provide support when needed. The steps are as follows:

  • We admitted we were powerless over alcohol that our lives had become unmanageable.
  • The members learn how to accept alcohol addiction as an illness, which they cannot control if somebody else suffers from it.
  • Accepted that a Power greater than ourselves could bring back our mental health.
  • Trying to change a person that has been affected by alcoholism can be a huge task and lead to breakdown.
  • The members then recognise the fact that there is a solution out there for them.
  • Made a resolution to turn our lives and our will over to the care of God in a way we perceived Him.
  • It is important that members learn to let go.
  • Made a searching and a fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  • A huge part of the steps are self-discovery, and this is the beginning of the procedure.
  • They then come up with how they have been affected by the condition and what they might have done to hurt others or themselves.
  • Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to others human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  • Thats a study of each listing in the group members moral inventory, which enables them to delve into each problem.
  • Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  • This is an important step because it comes after accepting in full that the recovery process is supported by a greater power.
  • Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  • This part of the twelve step process helps people realize how controlling or judgmental they have been towards an alcoholic and how counterproductive it is.
  • Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  • Very often, righting a wrong starts with yourself.
  • Most people believe they caused their loved one to start drinking.
  • They must learn to forgive and make it right for themselves.
  • Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  • As soon as you are ready to make amends, the next step is actually to do it.
  • Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  • Going through the 12 Steps is a process that takes time.
  • Slipping up is quite normal despite members already having made an inventory.
  • Step Ten acknowledges that this is a permanent process.
  • Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious effort with god as we understood him praying only for the knowledge of his will and the power to carry that out.
  • This is taking personal spiritual responsibility and surrender so as to start healing.
  • Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to others, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.
  • The last step includes perception that the persons journey is not over yet.
  • It is a support group and members get to assist other members get through the whole process.

Knowledge Of Higher Power

Members recognise there is a spiritual power that helps them to recover. The "higher power" or God is according to each person's perception of whom they consider Him to be. Members of all religions and beliefs are accepted at Al-Anon and none is coerced to change their beliefs.